Playing at Pyrography

You’ve probably worked out by now that when it comes to crafting, I like to have a bash at new things.  Before Christmas, I’d been reading about pyrography and watched a few YouTube videos and thought it looked like something I would enjoy doing.  I was lucky enough to receive a pyrography machine from Mr. L for Christmas, together with some sycamore plywood blanks to practice on and a book showing how to do various techniques and patterns.

Off I went to play with my new toy with much enthusiasm. To start with, I tried some shading patterns and then writing letters.  I then had the idea to stamp some of my card stamps onto the wood and burn over them, since I can’t draw for toffee! This was a very effective plan and so then, having built up my confidence, I decided to try my hand at drawing trees freestyle and put a setting sun behind.  Oh yes, running before I can walk is one of my mottos!

Anyhow, I decided a project was required rather than just messing about so, since my dear friend’s birthday was coming up and I’d bought her a bottle of gin and an engraved gin glass, I thought a presentation crate would be just the job.  I bought a crate from Hobbycraft, surfed the internet for gin puns and downloaded some jazzy fonts for writing said puns.

The words and phrases were scaled so that the size was suitable for the crate and also a reasonable size for burning, printed out and then traced onto the crate using graphite paper.

According to the book and the members of the Facebook pyrography group I’ve joined (great for advice and inspiration), some woods are easier to burn than others.  All recommend staying well away from pine as it’s very difficult to work with.  You’ve guessed what my crate was made from! Well, even with my very limited experience of pyrography and only having my sycamore plywood to compare it too, it was indeed tricky to work with; lots of smoke, a few flames and the nib sinking deeply into the wood at times.

But I got there in the end and was pleased with the overall look – although I’m sure it wouldn’t win any pyrography awards!

Once all the sides were complete, I put some packing ‘wotsits’ in the bottom and then topped that with some shredded paper to hold the goodies: an engraved gin glass, a bottle of King of Soho gin, a measure, 2 cans of tonic water and a couple of tea towels hand stamped with drink related images.

Once everything was in place, I wrapped the crate in cellophane and finished with a printed band and a bow.

This was the card to go with the gift, another one using the eclipse technique and  the Stampin’ Up! Half Full stamp set.

Carole loved both card and present which made me very happy indeed.

 

 

Images © 2019 Stampin’ Up!

 

Tool Kit Card – retired but not forgotten!

I guess it’s unusual for a Stampin’ Up! demonstrator to be using retired products and I appreciate that it may be a little frustrating if you fancy making this card but the products are no longer for sale, apologies for that.  However, there will be many people, like me, who purchased this set and would like some ideas – hence the ‘retired but not forgotten’ slogan.  As soon as I saw this set, I had to have it as my Dad is a retired joiner so it is the perfect set for cards for him – although I’m not sure how many cards with tools I can get away with sending him! My Dad is the most practical and capable person I know and I like to think that my crafting genes have descended from his practical ones! Mind you, my Mum’s no slouch in the crafting department either, particularly if it comes to knitting which I’m certain she can do with her eyes closed!  Anyhow, “Nailed It” and the accompanying die set “Build It” are a great set for masculine cards, which I find are rather a tricky genre.

For this card I used:

11½” x 4⅛” scored at 5¾” brown card, I used Crumb Cake but any brown will work

5¾” x 1¼” strip of the same brown card

6” x 3½” piece of silver foil card

5¼” x 2¼” Very Vanilla card for the liner

2” x 4” of coloured cardstock for the tool handles

SU! Nailed It stamp set

SU! Build It Framelit Dies

SU! Hardwood background stamp

SU! Pinewood Planks embossing folder

To make the toolbox handle, take the cardbase and mark the centre of the top edge of the card.  Place a shaped die to cut out the handle hole; I used an oval die measuring 2⅛” x 1⅛” from a label set I have but you could use a rectangle or similar, you just need a ‘hole’ shape!  Fold the base card along the score line, place the die centrally about ⅜” from the top edge and run through the Big Shot cutting both layers.  If it doesn’t quite cut through the bottom layer, it will make an impression so you know where to reposition the die to cut through that layer.

To shape the corners of the toolbox, mark the top edge 1½” along from each edge and 1¼” down each side and join with a pencil line.  Cut along these lines through both front and back pieces.  Erase any pencil marks still showing.

Your now have your basic toolbox.  You can use it like this or add more interest by stamping with the Hardwood stamp or using the Pinewood planks embossing folder.  I’m going to emboss this one.  Position the front of the card into the embossing folder and run through the Big Shot.  Repeat with the small piece of card.

Apply glue to the side and bottom edges of the small piece and attach it to the bottom of the base card.  It should make a small ‘pocket’ to put your tools in.

Make the tools by cutting out of silver foil sheet.  You can stamp and colour the tools but I decided to do a quicker version by just cutting out the tools using foil sheet and then adding handles onto the screwdriver, saw and hammer.

To make the tool handles, ink up the hardwood stamp and stamp onto the coloured cardstock you’ve chosen for the handles.  I’m using real red card and basic grey ink.  It’s easiest to lay the stamp face up, ink it up and then place the cardstock on top, cover with a piece of scrap paper and then rub over with your fingers.

Align the hammer, screwdriver and saw framelit handles with the printed grain and cut out.  Trim to leave the handles only and glue onto the tools.

Position the tools where you want them in the tool box and then dab a bit of glue behind the tops to secure.

Add a sentiment.  I stamped ‘Happy Birthday’ from the Perennial Birthday stamp set onto one of the ovals I cut out earlier for the toolbox handle.  This card would also be great for a retirement or ‘significant’ birthday when gold or silver glimmer paper could be used instead of the foil sheet for extra wow!

Using the Nailed It stamp set, stamp some screws, nails and nuts onto the card liner and the envelope.  Stick the liner to the card.

You’re all finished!

Another version with darker card for the ‘wood’ and grey handles

 

 

Thanks to Amanda Fowler of Inspiring Inkin’ for the inspiration for this card.

https://www.inspiringinkin.com/

 

Images ©Stampin’ Up!