Happily Ever After

It’s funny isn’t it, we haven’t been to a wedding for years and then get two within a few months.  Unfortunately, I wasn’t well enough to attend this one but I did get to try out a new card idea.

This Happily Ever After stamp by Anita Jeram is very detailed.  It’s great if you love colouring however, I wanted to try it out using minimal colouring.  First, I heat embossed the stamp using white powder onto vellum.

I coloured the back of the bunting with my Copic markers and also stamped and coloured the bride and groom mice onto Neenah Solar White card (my favourite for Copic colouring), cutting them out with the coordinating die.

After adding some decorative die cutting on top and bottom, the panel was glued to the card base.  The difficulty with vellum is that glue shows through.  I added plenty of glue under the bride and groom and a tiny dot into all four corners that could be covered with an embellishment.

As I hadn’t added a sentiment to the front, I did more stamping on the inside panel.   The images were stamped using 2nd generation inks so that they can be written over.  The sentiments were stamped in Blackberry Bliss ink to match the mat layer.

The final stage was to mount the panel onto a white card base and add some embellishments.  The bride and groom were glued in place and I used some enamel hearts to cover the glue dots in the corners.  Rhinestones and tiny sequins were also glued on for added sparkle.

Britannic Bunting!

To celebrate VE Day earlier this month, I wanted to put up some bunting even though we were not doing any actual celebrations.  I went to get the bunting from storage and realised that my Mum-in-law still has it – she has it on permanent loan for WI purposes!  Since I didn’t view bunting collection as being a critical journey during lockdown, I set about making some more.  As I wanted a patriotic look, I rifled through my fabric collection and pulled out all fabrics that had red, white or blue in them – most were offcuts from clothing or other sewing projects – and set to work. 

First job is to make a cardboard template for the flag size.  You can make the flags whatever size you like – mine were 6” x 7½”.  I also cut out a 2” cardboard spacer although you can put the flags next to each other if you prefer.  After drawing around the flags, I cut them out using pinking shears, which have a zig-zag edge so prevent the fabric from fraying.  I cut the top edge with regular scissors as a reminder as to which edge I needed to sew.  It’s easy to get confused when you’re head down in the sewing machine!

I used double fold bias binding to attach my flags.  Once the binding was opened up, the flag was laid inside with the top edge against the centre fold, the binding folded over and then stitched along the edge of the binding.  After laying the spacer alongside, I then positioned the next flag and stitched that in place. Repeat for as long as you want your bunting to be.

I made two lengths; one each for upstairs and downstairs.

This is a great project to repurpose old clothing or bedding.  It’s also very straightforward and quite quick to do making it ideal for beginners or children.   So, jazz up your lockdown celebration with some unique bunting!

 

 

 

Teabag Folded Christmas Tree

Mr L’s parents are going on a cruise over Christmas and New Year.  Since they won’t be at home, they won’t have a Christmas tree so I decided to make them a card with a dimensional tree on it so they have a little Christmas tree in their cabin over the festive season.  Whilst surfing around on YouTube, I watched a great video by Jan Brown (link at the end) on how to make a tree using a teabag folding technique.  I’ve never done any teabag folding so I decided to CASE Jan’s card and give teabag folding a go.

I started by cutting out 5 squares of patterned paper (I used Stampin’ Up! First Frost DSP) comprising squares of 1½”, 2”, 2½”, 3” and 3½”.  Since the DSP is only 6” square, I had to use two sheets so went with 2 different patterns.

The next step was to fold each piece in half once, and then on each diagonal.  The first folds go down to make valley folds and the diagonal folds push up into mountain folds.

The side folds were pushed inwards to make a triangular shape.

Next, I folded the points of the front triangle downwards, lining up the top edge of the triangle with the centreline.

Once all the pieces were folded, the pieces were glued together by inserting the point of the triangle into the next size down to form the tree shape.  I mounted the tree onto a Real Red card base, embellished with some heat embossed snowflakes and a wavy sentiment.  A ribbon bow finished off the top of the tree.

The side view shows the dimension of the tree.

Here’s the link to Jan’s blog.

Teabag Christmas Card & Ornament Video

 

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