Messy Eaters!

Do you have a messy eater in your family? I can ask this as I am one myself! This is largely borne by our slovenly ways of eating our tea from lap trays in front of the TV rather than sitting at the table.  To resolve this problem, instead of making us eat at the table, I made myself a bib.  I got my pattern from the website shown at the end however, since Craftsy ceased a few months ago, it’s no longer available.  The shape is fairly simple though so it’d be easy to draught yourself.  This is my original.

I made this one for my sister (we’re a family of messy eaters, apart from my Mum!) for a funny birthday gift – she had asked for one so I was confident she wouldn’t be offended.  Like me, she is a big cat fan so cat-themed fabric had to be used.   After washing and drying the fabrics to pre-shrink them, I started by cutting out a front, some quilt wadding (extra absorbency!) and a backing (cut out the opposite was to the front).

After attaching the wadding to the back piece, I sewed the front and back together, leaving a gap at the bottom.  I graded the seam allowance and snipped the curves before turning the right way out through the gap and pressing the edges.

Next, I top stitched all around the edge of the bib before marking up quilting lines.  This step is entirely optional but I think it looks nice.  I use a heat erasable pen called Pilot Frixion (from Amazon, of course!) to draw my lines.  After sewing the quilting lines, I ran the iron over the bib and all the pen marks disappeared, like magic!

The last job was to attach some Velcro for fastening, although snaps or press studs would work equally well.

And here’s the finished article!

To make it look a bit nicer as a gift, I folded it and wrapped with a ribbon and a fun tag. Have I given you a top Christmas gift idea??!

 

 

http://www.hemmein.com/upcycled-grown-up-bibs/

Britannic Bunting!

To celebrate VE Day earlier this month, I wanted to put up some bunting even though we were not doing any actual celebrations.  I went to get the bunting from storage and realised that my Mum-in-law still has it – she has it on permanent loan for WI purposes!  Since I didn’t view bunting collection as being a critical journey during lockdown, I set about making some more.  As I wanted a patriotic look, I rifled through my fabric collection and pulled out all fabrics that had red, white or blue in them – most were offcuts from clothing or other sewing projects – and set to work. 

First job is to make a cardboard template for the flag size.  You can make the flags whatever size you like – mine were 6” x 7½”.  I also cut out a 2” cardboard spacer although you can put the flags next to each other if you prefer.  After drawing around the flags, I cut them out using pinking shears, which have a zig-zag edge so prevent the fabric from fraying.  I cut the top edge with regular scissors as a reminder as to which edge I needed to sew.  It’s easy to get confused when you’re head down in the sewing machine!

I used double fold bias binding to attach my flags.  Once the binding was opened up, the flag was laid inside with the top edge against the centre fold, the binding folded over and then stitched along the edge of the binding.  After laying the spacer alongside, I then positioned the next flag and stitched that in place. Repeat for as long as you want your bunting to be.

I made two lengths; one each for upstairs and downstairs.

This is a great project to repurpose old clothing or bedding.  It’s also very straightforward and quite quick to do making it ideal for beginners or children.   So, jazz up your lockdown celebration with some unique bunting!

 

 

 

Funky Face Masks

In last week’s briefing regarding the new rules that may apply coming out of lockdown in the UK, Boris hinted that face coverings will be the way to go.  There are a few mask designs online and I tried out a few.  The Olsen mask is a widely available free download and there’s another variation at www.craftpassion.com. After making up one of each, I combined the two to get my preferred fit and function.  The masks have a filter pocket where an additional layer of protection can be inserted.  I’m using Henry Hoover vacuum bags which are made from 3 layers of spun polypropylene.  I’m showing two masks as I’m generally making these in pairs: one to wash and one to wear.  Hygiene is still key to preventing the spread of this virus, as is social distancing when possible.

Important note: it is vital to remove the nose wire and filter before washing – those bits of wire won’t do your washing machine any good at all!

Disclaimer.  These masks are not medically recognised or tested.  Use at your own discretion.

The most suitable fabric for the mask is 100% closely woven cotton, like quilting fabric.  It needs to be pre-washed at the temperature you intend laundering the mask at, otherwise the mask may shrink when you wash it.

The templates are here:  Face Mask Template….

and a downloadable tutorial is here:  Face Mask Tutorial pdf.

Cut out mask pieces on folded fabric (either right side to right side or wrong side to wrong side) to cut mirrored pieces of each template.  Cut 2 each for the mask outer, lining and filter pocket.

Turn ¼” of the straight edges of the filter pocket over twice, press in place and then sew to secure.  Turn the edge of the corresponding mask outer and lining pieces over by ¼”.  Sew the outer, lining and pocket pieces together along the curved front edge using a ¼” seam. Press seam allowance open or over to one side.

Lining up the seams, baste pocket along top and bottom edges onto the right side of lining within the seam allowance (approx. ⅛” from the edge).

With right side together, stitch mask front to lining, leaving one edge (the one pressed under in stage 2) open for turning.

Turn right side out through the side opening and press.  Fold in approx. 1” on each side, press and then stitch in place.

Feed a 10” piece of elastic into the channel created on each side of the mask and tie in a knot (in a position which gives you the best fit).  Feed the knot into the channel.

Optional nose wire to provide a better fit closer to the face.

Sew a L-shaped channel ¼” from the top edge of the mask – ensure it is only closed at one end!  Take a length of wire about 3½” (I used a paperclip opened out) and turn the ends over using pliers.  This will prevent the wire poking through the fabric.  Insert the wire into the channel inside the filter pocket.

Cut 2 pieces of your filter material and sew along the curved edge.  Open out and insert into the pocket.

Step out in style!

Stay safe.