Quaint Quilling

Have you heard of quilling? It’s been around for hundreds of years and used to be the pastime of genteel ladies during the Georgian and Victorian times and was also practised by nuns and monks to decorate religious artefacts.  Modern papers and adhesives have changed the work produced but the techniques are based on old ideas.

My book showed some Charles Rennie Mackintosh style roses and they looked to be the easiest of the Closed Loose Coils, since they started with a fold rather than rolling.  I glued a strip of pale and dark pink together at the end and started the folding.

Once I’d got to the end, I released the tension and then glued the other ends in place to secure the rose shape.  I made several of these and some with darker pink strips.  The leaves were made using a different technique called Wheatear Coils.  As I haven’t done this before, I experimented with trying to make the leaves in different ways.  The flowers didn’t seem to sit well by themselves so I used some purple strips to make a vase type structure.

After the individual quilling was complete, I set to work on the arrangement and glued them in place after stamping the sentiment.  Three of the roses were glued on top of the arrangement to give a more 3D effect.

To finish, I added a few tiny heart embellishments and mounted on a green mat and pink card base to compliment the floral arrangment.

As usual, I made two cards, one each for the two mums in my life: my Mum and my Mum-in-Law. One of the best things about handmade cards is that no two are identical – they’re the same but different!

Coffee or Cocktails?

Mr L gave me the idea for this week’s card where sometimes, a coffee just won’t cut it! In the Nothing’s Better Than stamp set, there are lots of fun little phrases to pair with the main words but none that quite say this.  I first tried doing small lettering like the stamps but the big, bold lettering worked better for the feel of the card.

I used the Love You More Than dies and wanted my focal words to stand out on a background.  For the words, I blended Misty Moonlight/Smoky Slate and So Saffron/Rococo Rose onto two pieces of white card. For the black backgrounds, I drew around the outside of the die and fussy cut.

The black halo really helps the words have drama!

Next, using my grid paper, I experimented with wording layouts and styles, eventually choosing a plain, bold style.  I transferred this onto vellum before transferring onto the card using my light box.

To finish, I stamped the coffee cup and cocktail glass, colouring with the same inks and die cutting, then adhering to the card.  The words were raised on foam adhesive.

 

 

Images © 2020 Stampin’ Up!

In The Spotlight

Sometimes you don’t need the whole picture presented to you, just snippets in spotlights.  That was my inspiration for my card this week anyway.  I like the Stampin’ Up! Field of Flowers for silhouette images but I’m not keen on the coloured version so I thought I’d play around with it to see how I could use the coloured stamps on a card using the spotlight technique.

I began by stamping the leaves in Mint Macaron and the flowers in Rococo Rose, Highland Heather and So Saffron together with a few dragonflies in Smoky Slate.  Then I used various punches to cut circles to make my spotlights.

Next, I made my background by stamping the sentiment and ink blending a few circles using my sponge daubers and my homemade circle mask.

For the liner and envelope, I punched a circle from a post-it note and stamped the images into the hole so that the image would have a circular shape to mirror the spotlights on the fronts.

Lastly, I assembled the card, gluing some spotlights directly onto the card front and raising some up on foam dimensionals, and adding a few rhinestones.

I’m really happy with the results of my experiment!

 

 

Images © 2020 Stampin’ Up!