A Cricut Challenge

I bought this Nordic ornament stamp last week and I’ve been trying to think of the best way to present it.  It’s about 5¼” across and I don’t have any dies that big.  Also, I wanted it to have the hanger part on the top too so a straight circle die wouldn’t work.  This seemed like a perfect job for the Cricut.

To begin, I stamped the hanger and bow and scanned it in to my computer.  I imported it into Inkscape using a great tutorial from TroyTube on YouTube and then added an offset (the red part) to give me my basic cut-out shape.  I played around with the shape a bit to remove the holes to make the cut-out section sturdier.

Next, I uploaded the finished shape into Cricut Design Space and scaled it to fit the stamped image.  I made the basic card shape by making a circle 5½” diameter and welding the ornament hanger onto the top.  I also sliced a smidge off the bottom so that the card would stand up.  The shape was duplicated and flipped horizontally so that it would be a mirror image and then overlapped the first circle a small amount to give a place for the fold.  A test cut revealed not quite a perfect fit but close enough.

My first card was for a swap in a Facebook group.  I stamped the image in Versamark and heat embossed in white before blending pink, purple and blue inks over.  The embossing resists the ink but gives texture with a lovely blended background.  Lastly, I added some rhinestones on the centre of the snowflakes and a small sentiment.  And a decorated envelope, of course!

I tried the stamp out on other coloured cards to see if it was as effective.  It gave good results whether it was heat embossed or just stamped, although a stamp positioner does help as it’s tricky to get all sections of big stamps to stamp well first time.

White embossing powder on Real Red and gold embossing powder on Shaded Spruce
White embossing powder on Sahara Sand and silver ink on Blackberry Bliss

I hate waste so try to salvage anything that hasn’t gone to plan.  Tags to the rescue!

Holy Crap!

A very dear friend of mine had a milestone birthday recently so I wanted to make him a special, one-off, kind of a card.  I had a quick surf on Pinterest and saw this idea and knew immediately that it would perfect!

I wanted my ‘bathroom wall’ to comprise 2 parts; a wallpapered top and a wood panelled bottom, so began by selecting some patterned paper for my wallpaper and dry embossing some card for the wood panelling.

Next, I needed to make a miniature toilet roll… like you do. I used a straightened-out paper clip for the holder and glued a small tube of brown card around and bent the wire at 90° either end of the tube.

Actual toilet paper was then cut into strips and glued onto the tube and wound around until I had the desired thickness of toilet roll.

I punched a couple of tiny holes into my wood panelling and inserted the wires, bending and securing them on the reverse side.

The writing was next.  I had planned on using die-cut lettering but all my die sets were too big.  Then, I tried hand lettering but the finish on the paper made the ink patchy.  That left heat embossing.  I used my Stamparatus stamp positioning tool and a ‘test stamp’ to ensure my letters were aligned correctly….

….before heat embossing the lettering onto my ‘wallpaper’ using Versamark ink and silver embossing powder.

I cut the numbers from silver glitter paper and cut 2 circles, one from silver foil card and the other from some mercury acetate as I wanted the circle to look like an ageing mirror.  A couple of brads were poked through to resemble the mirror fittings.

The top layers were mounted, using thin foam adhesive to hide the wires behind, on a mat layer and card-base, the colours of which were taken from the patterned paper.  A thin silver card ‘dado rail’ finished off the join.

Lastly, I had to make a box rather than an envelope for the card so the toilet roll didn’t get squashed.

I think this card and the bottle of anti-ageing moisturiser gave him a laugh!

 

Faux Torn Technique

This week, I learned that a technique that I’ve been using for years actually has a name!  It’s called the Faux Torn technique, as the finished card looks like it has a torn strip of patterned paper stuck to the card when it’s actually an inked panel.  It’s very simple to do and a change of the inked colours or stamped images completely alters the look.

To begin, I tore the edges off the sticky edge of a post-it note although torn copier paper will do just fine too.

Next, I blended two or three complementary colours into the torn gap, followed by some simple stamping.

Lastly, I added a greeting and mounted the card on layers to match the blended colours.

Pool Party, Bermuda Bay and Pretty Peacock inks, Lakeside stamp set, mounted on Pretty Peacock and Bermuda Bay card.

This is another version done in different colours and stamp.

So Saffron and Poppy Parade inks and cardstock and Painted Poppies stamp set.

For this card, rather than just simple stamping, I heat embossed the design and then used the Subtle embossing folder for some texture.

Bermuda Bay, Pretty Peacock and Night of Navy inks, Botanical Bliss stamps,  and silver heat embossing and Subtle embossing folder.

My last card was a card for my in-laws’ 40th wedding anniversary.  I repeated the torn panel to cover more of the card background.

Cherry Cobbler and Blackberry Bliss inks and cardstock and Forever Lovely stamps for a ruby wedding anniversary card.

Four cards, each with a completely different look!

 

 

Images © 2020 Stampin’ Up!