Cardstock Strips

This week’s card is one I made after watching the fabulous Jennifer McGuire on YouTube.  Her card looked so elegant so I wanted to have a go.  On reflection, I think I could have done with a larger stencil that covered more of the card.

To begin, I cut a bunch of strips of various widths from 4 colours of card.  This is a great way to use up some of those off-cuts!

Next, I glued the strips onto some scrap paper and trimmed the panel to the height of the card blank.  With Distress Oxide Weathered Wood, I used a blending brush to stencil the Frame pattern (Sweet Poppy Stencils) centrally onto the panel and card blank.

The birthday and shadow dies are by Honey Bee Stamps and were cut from the same-coloured card as the strips and mounted onto a stitched circle die cut.

I finished the sentiment panel with some stamping.

Due to the stencil not being quite big enough, I thought the card needed a bit more interest so added rhinestones for a touch of bling.

Floating Frames

My cards this week use a technique called Floating Frames, which I saw on Jennifer McGuire’s YouTube channel.  She is a very talented crafter and makes everything look so effortless!  The technique uses lots of die cuts mounted on foam adhesive to create a frame which looks like it is floating above the card.  It has the added bonus in that the process also creates a decorative panel for another card – two for the price of one!

I used the large rose and thistle images from Frosted Florals and their matching thinlits to create my die cuts, using Lovely Lipstick and Mint Macaron inks.

The next step was to position these die cuts over a piece of scrap card cut to the size of my required frame and then covered with a layer of GLAD Press’n Seal (available from Amazon).  This holds the pieces in place by temporarily adhering them to the scrap card.

I then cut around the scrap card to create the outside of the frame and then positioned the die to cut out the shape. I used a heart but any shape will work.

This creates the frame and the decorative panel.

The next step was to remove the backing card and add foam adhesive to support the pieces.  I had thought that this job was quite labour intensive, however this paled into insignificance when it came to taking the backing pieces off, which took an absolute ETERNITY!!!!

What I did discover was that the piece is quite unstable once the card is removed!  It’s almost impossible to lift into position as the film is flimsy and the sticky bits try to stick to each other.  I don’t recall Jennifer having this trouble!!  Anyhow, I got around it by lining up the pieces face down on my grid paper and then placing the card on top.

The final part is to remove the Press’n Seal.  This had to be done slowly as it was quite sticky and the film did leave a tacky residue so I dabbed over the pieces with my Embossing Buddy.

So here are the finished pieces.  On the frame, I added some rhinestones in the gaps and a Happy Anniversary sentiment.

For the second card, I added pearl accents into the gaps and left it blank to add an appropriate sentiment at a later date.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images © 2019 Stampin’ Up!

Festive Foliage and Friends!

Last Friday I had the most enjoyable day when some friends came around for coffee, biscuits and wreath making.   Mr. L had been busy with his chain saw on our overgrown Leylandii hedge to give us some base materials and I had pruned the eucalyptus and rosemary bushes that I let grow large for this very purpose.  Between the rain storms, I’d nipped out and cut a little holly and ivy and from the hedgerow and I’d gathered some teasels from the scrub land next to our house and some pine cones from a local park.  There are no air miles attached to these wreaths!!

Jane’s husband Dave also came along to offer words of encouragement and be a guest cat bed for Leia….

I’d watched a Gardener’s World video and made a wreath last year so I was the appointed “teacher”.   We started with a 12” wire frame and using binding wire, attached the various base foliage to the frame by winding the wire around the frame and foliage, wiggling it between the fronds and leaves to avoid getting a ‘bandaged’ look!

This process was repeated until the base layer was completed and the wire frame was covered.

Next, we prepared the accent pieces – the holly, ivy, pinecones and teasels – by wrapping the stems with floristry wire.  Our holly was nude so we attached some artificial berries for added colour.

These pieces were pushed through the base layer and secured to the metal frame.  We finished the wreaths by making a bow using wire edged ribbon and secured that into the frame with some binding wire.

Here are Ruth, Joy and Jane with their finished wreaths.  They look so professional!

We had so much fun making these and they really weren’t difficult nor expensive to make so I encourage you to have a go!

Since there was a lot of foliage left, Jane took home a couple of the eucalyptus branches for the church flowers so Dave got his own aromatherapy experience on their return journey!

I made three wreaths in total; one for us and one each for my Mum and my Mum-in-law.  I finished off my wreaths with a bit of spray glitter.

Last year we bought mini Christmas trees, hellebores and cyclamen to put in the wall mangers which gradually died when I neglected to remove them and plant them in the garden in the spring.  So, since I had enough base foliage to make wreaths for about half of Hampshire(!), I decided to fashion some wreath style Christmas trees.  I started with some garden wire mesh and cut and moulded it to form a sort of half cone shape and then added the foliage in tree type layers.

Some accent pieces, fairy lights and a star for the top and my Festive Foliage Christmas Tree (that looks like Cousin It!) was complete.