Expanding Accordion Card

As I mentioned earlier in the year, I have several ‘big’ birthdays this year, one of which was my father-in-law’s 70th.  If you ask most card makers, the consensus will be that cards for blokes are difficult – I am no different!  My FIL is a very practical man and builds models (designed by him and printed on his 3D printer) so I figured he’d appreciate an interactive card.  I saw this video by Sam Calcott on YouTube and thought it’d be perfect for him. At the end, I’ve linked to Sam’s blog which has all the dimensions.

My card was to be a 5” x 7” so I trimmed 2 pieces of A4 card to 7” deep and scored them at 5” and then at ¾” intervals, trimming the last section off one panel.  These were then glued together using the small section as the glue tab. The number of folds can be adjusted depending on the number of spaces required for the sentiment, for example ‘CHRISTMAS’ would need an insert to give 9 mountain folds.

Next, I cut my mats and layers for the flip panels and large panels for the front and back of the card.  I used some dies to cut out the letters and numbers and my Cricut to cut the decoration for the front panel and inside from vinyl.

Now for the assembly! My top tip is the top row letters need to be on the right-hand side of the flip panel and the bottom row on the left.  Ask me how I know this!!!  After assembling each of the panels, the top row is glued onto the left side of the mountain fold and the bottom row onto the right side.

I transferred my vinyl onto the panels and adhered them to the card.  This card is quite thick so needs a belly band or ribbon to keep it closed.  I’d just had some flowers delivered so I reused the ribbon that came with them. It was secured by glueing it onto the back of the card (under the panel to write on), leaving long enough tails to tie a knot and bow.  I also added a fun little tag.

The outside…

…and the inside!

Here’s the card in action!  Apologies: Mr L struggles a bit with the double knot.

This card doesn’t fit into a normal envelope and it’s also quite heavy so I’d recommend making a box to present it in.

https://mixedupcraft.com/2021/08/23/showstopper-expanding-accordion-cards/

Gorgeous Gift Wallet

Giving money is thought, by some, to be lacking in thought.  However, I like it since it gives the recipient free reign to spend it wherever they want rather than being tied to a particular store with a gift card.  One of my colleagues managed to get married last year so the watch had a collection for him and his new wife.  Quite a substantial sum was collected and we didn’t want to present it in a tatty white envelope, so I was asked to make a presentation wallet.

Making a presentation wallet (of any size) is fairly straight forward but needs a bit of planning out.  To begin, the finished size and depth is required to draw up a plan view.  This will help determine if your box can be cut from one sheet of card or not.  This is my plan for the box I made which was 3¾” x 5⅝” x ¼”.  Once the front, back and pocket sections are added, together with the top, base and sides (for the depth), the next thing is to work out where the tabs need to go in order to glue the box together.

I don’t usually go to the trouble of drawing my plan out to scale, it usually looks like the sketch in the top of the next photo!  After scoring all the lines, I then used these as guides for cutting away the excess card, which left me with this.

I cut pieces of DSP to decorate the panels and also added a thin magnet underneath the pocket panel.  A magnetic closure always makes a gift wallet feel that bit more special!

Once all the decorative panels were in place, I dropped the other magnet onto the front of the wallet.  It was naturally drawn into the correct place, where I added a spot of glue under it.

To cover the magnet, I then made a focal panel from layered ovals, the bride and groom’s initials and some hearts.  I gave the metallic paper some added interest by dry embossing it. I added a polka dot tulle bow as the magnet was just visible.

It’s not shown here but I added a white panel on the back of the front cover (the part at the top of this photo) on which I wrote the message from the watch.

I was really pleased to get a message from the couple saying that they loved the personalised gift wallet.  Feedback like that makes creating bespoke gifts all the more rewarding!

Swing Fold Card

This fancy fold card style has lots of dimension and extra wow! when it’s opened and the parts move.  It may look a little complicated but it’s not really.

To begin, I cut my card base and a layer of DSP and cut a rectangle from the front of the pair of them, attached together with a little temporary adhesive.  The piece of card base will be used later so don’t discard it!

Next, I cut the liner, which is also the mechanism to make the swing fold.  Score the card at ¼, ½ and ¾ across the piece and fold ‘mountain-mountain-valley’, as shown in the photo.

Place the liner with the first ‘mountain’ fold facing up into the card front and mark the left-hand side of the hole.  Remove the liner and cut away slightly bigger than the hole using either a trimmer or I used the next size up rectangle die and the partial die-cutting technique.

The liner is then glued into the card base by adhering the bit around the cut away to the back of the opening and the last quarter of the lining to the right-hand side of the back of the card base. 

After gluing the DSP onto the front, I attached the swing panel, which is the section of card base cut out at step 1.  Apply the glue to the swing mechanism only and attach the panel.

Lastly, decorate as you wish!

I used Stampin’ Up! Pampered Pets for my cards.

It’s also possible to make this card in landscape format too and using an oval cut out rather than a rectangle.

I think I’ll try a square version next time to give more space for writing my message.

Images © 2021 Stampin’ Up!