2-for-1 Thank You Cards

Having had fun doing the ink ‘smooshing’ technique for last week’s blog post, I thought I’d try my hand at some watercolour backgrounds this week, although I used calligraphy ink rather than watercolour paint.  I’ve watched many, many YouTube tutorials on making water colour washes but it’s not quite as easy as it looks – well, not for me anyway!  Using the Stampin’ Up! Thank You die, I wanted to use the positive and negative spaces of the background to make 2 cards, hence the 2-for-1 title.  For an even speedier set of cards, use patterned paper instead of making a background.

I began by taking my piece of watercolour paper and wetting it thoroughly with clean water.  I then painted stripes of pink and yellow ink and let them blend together.  I then spritzed the piece with some Frost White Shimmer paint (mixed with isopropyl alcohol) for some shine, although the nozzle of the sprayer was a bit iffy so its more splotches than mist 😊

For my second sheet, I wet the paper and then just dropped in pools of blue, pink and yellow ink and sprayed with a little more water to get them to mix.  Again, I spritzed (splotched!) Frost White Shimmer Paint on and then left to dry.

As the water colour paper got very wet, it was a bit crinkly when it dried but I was planning to run it through the Big Shot so that flattened it out a bit.  I used the largest and third largest stitched rectangle dies to cut the background and a border and cut the Thank You from the central piece.

In the interests of using up as much of my inked background as possible and to give a co-ordinated look to the inside of the card, I cut the left over background ⅜” around the rectangular cut-out, cut this rectangle into 4 (2 tops and 2 sides) and then used these pieces to edge my card inner.

I adhered the negative piece onto my card base and then, whilst all the bits were still in the die, applied spray adhesive to the back and placed the die into the ‘hole’ on the card and pressed out the tiny pieces to make the words complete. This made card no.1.

Card no.2 was made by sticking the frame onto the card base and then adding the Thank You cut out to the centre.

These are the cards made with the second background using the same technique.

The sweet peas in the shot are called ‘Terry Wogan’ and are prolific flowerers.  They’re providing me with many gloriously scented vases of flowers around the house at the moment!

 

Images © 2019 Stampin’ Up!

The Great British Music Room!

You may have seen our jazzy music room wall behind our parents in the Christmas Carol Evening blog post. When it came to decorating our music room, so called because it houses all our musical instruments including Mr. L’s kazoo (!), we decided on a red, white and blue theme. Now nothing is more red, white and blue themed than the Union Jack or Union Flag (I’m never sure what we’re supposed to call it) so that seemed a good starting point. I thought the whole flag would be too much so decided on just a quarter of what would have been a HUGE flag.  It’s quite tricky to draw the Union Jack and have it look right so Google came to my aid and I found out what the ratios should be.

The cross of St. George is red and is one fifth the flag’s height.  The white border is one fifteenth of the height.

The saltires of St. Andrew and St. Patrick are intertwined, with the St. Andrew cross being one fifth the flag’s height.  This is then divided into 6 and then two of the six bits are allocated to the St. Patrick cross.  Confused yet???  Luckily there was this handy diagram to help me out!

Image courtesy of https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Jack

The wall was already painted white so I drew the dimensions on the wall in pencil and then masked off the red and blue areas.

We had a corner sofa in the room which didn’t work with the other furniture in the room.  Basically, it had one too many seats! I decided that we could chop it down and make it a straight sofa instead – like you do.  Well it was almost a situation where I’d bitten off more that I could chew so I roped in Mr. L to help me out.  I have to stress that this is not for the faint hearted and could have gone very badly and expensively wrong.  Lots of head scratching ensued but, in the end, we rebuilt the sofa into the size we wanted.

I completed the look by changing the ‘feature’ cushions from a turquoise floral fabric to a nautical stripe fabric, which I had treated with fire retardant spray.

And so The Great British Music Room was born!