Faux Torn Technique

This week, I learned that a technique that I’ve been using for years actually has a name!  It’s called the Faux Torn technique, as the finished card looks like it has a torn strip of patterned paper stuck to the card when it’s actually an inked panel.  It’s very simple to do and a change of the inked colours or stamped images completely alters the look.

To begin, I tore the edges off the sticky edge of a post-it note although torn copier paper will do just fine too.

Next, I blended two or three complementary colours into the torn gap, followed by some simple stamping.

Lastly, I added a greeting and mounted the card on layers to match the blended colours.

Pool Party, Bermuda Bay and Pretty Peacock inks, Lakeside stamp set, mounted on Pretty Peacock and Bermuda Bay card.

This is another version done in different colours and stamp.

So Saffron and Poppy Parade inks and cardstock and Painted Poppies stamp set.

For this card, rather than just simple stamping, I heat embossed the design and then used the Subtle embossing folder for some texture.

Bermuda Bay, Pretty Peacock and Night of Navy inks, Botanical Bliss stamps,  and silver heat embossing and Subtle embossing folder.

My last card was a card for my in-laws’ 40th wedding anniversary.  I repeated the torn panel to cover more of the card background.

Cherry Cobbler and Blackberry Bliss inks and cardstock and Forever Lovely stamps for a ruby wedding anniversary card.

Four cards, each with a completely different look!

 

 

Images © 2020 Stampin’ Up!

Frosted Floral Farewell

It’s time for the new Stampin’ Up! catalogue and I’m sad to say that a lot of my favourites are out ☹ Two of my faves are the First Frost stamp set and coordinating Frosted Bouquet dies.  Whilst these will be disappearing from the catalogue, they’ll not be leaving my personal collection any time soon.  There are two cards on the post this week, the second one was inspired by the liner of the first! Just goes to show that inspiration comes from all sorts of places.

First, I stamped and die cut a selection of flower and leaf images and heat embossed the sentiment on a pretty label punch.

Elements from First Frost

I repeat stamped the thistle image on a Mint Macaron card front and dry embossed with the Layered Leaves.  At this point, I realised that the card base wouldn’t be sturdy enough so I cut it down to make the front panel of my card.

Mint Macaron card and ink.

The next job was to arrange the flowers and foliage elements around the sentiment to create my focal image.

I stamped the liner and envelope by stamping the flower and then masked the flower to stamp the leaf image.

To break up the card front, I attached a strip of burlap ribbon onto a strip of Lovely Lipstick and then mounted the focal on top.  The panel was then mounted onto a Lovely Lipstick card base to make a very colourful creation.

Whilst I was making the liner for the above card, I really liked the liner so decided to make a card using that design. I repeat stamped the flower and then masked the images whilst I stamped the foliage between.  To finish, I added a few rhinestones.

Unfortunately, when I posted these two cards, the minute I’d dropped them in the postbox, I realised that I forgot to put stamps on the envelopes.  Doh!

 

 

Images © 2020 Stampin’ Up!

Britannic Bunting!

To celebrate VE Day earlier this month, I wanted to put up some bunting even though we were not doing any actual celebrations.  I went to get the bunting from storage and realised that my Mum-in-law still has it – she has it on permanent loan for WI purposes!  Since I didn’t view bunting collection as being a critical journey during lockdown, I set about making some more.  As I wanted a patriotic look, I rifled through my fabric collection and pulled out all fabrics that had red, white or blue in them – most were offcuts from clothing or other sewing projects – and set to work. 

First job is to make a cardboard template for the flag size.  You can make the flags whatever size you like – mine were 6” x 7½”.  I also cut out a 2” cardboard spacer although you can put the flags next to each other if you prefer.  After drawing around the flags, I cut them out using pinking shears, which have a zig-zag edge so prevent the fabric from fraying.  I cut the top edge with regular scissors as a reminder as to which edge I needed to sew.  It’s easy to get confused when you’re head down in the sewing machine!

I used double fold bias binding to attach my flags.  Once the binding was opened up, the flag was laid inside with the top edge against the centre fold, the binding folded over and then stitched along the edge of the binding.  After laying the spacer alongside, I then positioned the next flag and stitched that in place. Repeat for as long as you want your bunting to be.

I made two lengths; one each for upstairs and downstairs.

This is a great project to repurpose old clothing or bedding.  It’s also very straightforward and quite quick to do making it ideal for beginners or children.   So, jazz up your lockdown celebration with some unique bunting!

 

 

 

Rainbow Leaves     

There are lots of rainbows around at the moment, not the meteorological kind but ones created to celebrate the work of the NHS during the pandemic.  This made me think of doing a rainbow-themed card for my blog this week.  I used the leaf cluster from Rooted in Nature as my feature image whilst the large sentiment from the same set was the focal point.

To begin, I stamped the sentiment just left of centre.

Next, I stamped the leaf image seven times, changing between the rainbow colours each time.

Since I had decided to use a Pacific Point card base, I decorated the liner and envelope with the leaves stamped in the same colour.

To complete the card, the front panel was mounted on a black layer before being adhered to the card base.

 

 

 

Images © 2020 Stampin’ Up!

Funky Face Masks

In last week’s briefing regarding the new rules that may apply coming out of lockdown in the UK, Boris hinted that face coverings will be the way to go.  There are a few mask designs online and I tried out a few.  The Olsen mask is a widely available free download and there’s another variation at www.craftpassion.com. After making up one of each, I combined the two to get my preferred fit and function.  The masks have a filter pocket where an additional layer of protection can be inserted.  I’m using Henry Hoover vacuum bags which are made from 3 layers of spun polypropylene.  I’m showing two masks as I’m generally making these in pairs: one to wash and one to wear.  Hygiene is still key to preventing the spread of this virus, as is social distancing when possible.

Important note: it is vital to remove the nose wire and filter before washing – those bits of wire won’t do your washing machine any good at all!

Disclaimer.  These masks are not medically recognised or tested.  Use at your own discretion.

The most suitable fabric for the mask is 100% closely woven cotton, like quilting fabric.  It needs to be pre-washed at the temperature you intend laundering the mask at, otherwise the mask may shrink when you wash it.

The templates are here:  Face Mask Template….

and a downloadable tutorial is here:  Face Mask Tutorial pdf.

Cut out mask pieces on folded fabric (either right side to right side or wrong side to wrong side) to cut mirrored pieces of each template.  Cut 2 each for the mask outer, lining and filter pocket.

Turn ¼” of the straight edges of the filter pocket over twice, press in place and then sew to secure.  Turn the edge of the corresponding mask outer and lining pieces over by ¼”.  Sew the outer, lining and pocket pieces together along the curved front edge using a ¼” seam. Press seam allowance open or over to one side.

Lining up the seams, baste pocket along top and bottom edges onto the right side of lining within the seam allowance (approx. ⅛” from the edge).

With right side together, stitch mask front to lining, leaving one edge (the one pressed under in stage 2) open for turning.

Turn right side out through the side opening and press.  Fold in approx. 1” on each side, press and then stitch in place.

Feed a 10” piece of elastic into the channel created on each side of the mask and tie in a knot (in a position which gives you the best fit).  Feed the knot into the channel.

Optional nose wire to provide a better fit closer to the face.

Sew a L-shaped channel ¼” from the top edge of the mask – ensure it is only closed at one end!  Take a length of wire about 3½” (I used a paperclip opened out) and turn the ends over using pliers.  This will prevent the wire poking through the fabric.  Insert the wire into the channel inside the filter pocket.

Cut 2 pieces of your filter material and sew along the curved edge.  Open out and insert into the pocket.

Step out in style!

Stay safe.