Creative Card Class

As you are no doubt aware by now, I love to craft.  What I have discovered is that I also love to share crafting with others.  My hope is that they will get the same enjoyment and reward from it as I do.  So last week, I spent a fun couple of hours one evening teaching these lovely ladies how to make beautiful greetings cards to send to their nearest and dearest – or not as it seems they were so taken with the finished products that they were keeping them all for themselves!

The ladies in action!

I try to make the class interesting by introducing different techniques for each card.  The cards we made at this class were as follows:

Dragonfly and Dandelions

This featured on my blog in October 2018 and has become one of my most pinned items on Pinterest 🙂  It entails simple stamping and a couple of die cuts.

Paper Pieced Lady

This idea was from Amanda, my SU! team leader.  I used the technique with a teapot and cup stamp in my blog post on 10th March 2019.  It involves stamping and fussy cutting.

‘In Focus’ Dandelions

I don’t know if this is the correct term for this technique but to me, it makes the eye focus onto the cut out-sections so the title seemed to make sense.  This card is created using stamps and punches.

Embossed Foil Card

This card uses an embossing folder and a die cut.

Thanks to Ruth and Nikki for being such great students and making the evening so enjoyable.  At the end of the night, despite their initial concerns that they wouldn’t be able to create the cards, all were completed and looked fabulous – nice work ladies!

 

 

Images © 2019 Stampin’ Up!

Floating Frames

My cards this week use a technique called Floating Frames, which I saw on Jennifer McGuire’s YouTube channel.  She is a very talented crafter and makes everything look so effortless!  The technique uses lots of die cuts mounted on foam adhesive to create a frame which looks like it is floating above the card.  It has the added bonus in that the process also creates a decorative panel for another card – two for the price of one!

I used the large rose and thistle images from Frosted Florals and their matching thinlits to create my die cuts, using Lovely Lipstick and Mint Macaron inks.

The next step was to position these die cuts over a piece of scrap card cut to the size of my required frame and then covered with a layer of GLAD Press’n Seal (available from Amazon).  This holds the pieces in place by temporarily adhering them to the scrap card.

I then cut around the scrap card to create the outside of the frame and then positioned the die to cut out the shape. I used a heart but any shape will work.

This creates the frame and the decorative panel.

The next step was to remove the backing card and add foam adhesive to support the pieces.  I had thought that this job was quite labour intensive, however this paled into insignificance when it came to taking the backing pieces off, which took an absolute ETERNITY!!!!

What I did discover was that the piece is quite unstable once the card is removed!  It’s almost impossible to lift into position as the film is flimsy and the sticky bits try to stick to each other.  I don’t recall Jennifer having this trouble!!  Anyhow, I got around it by lining up the pieces face down on my grid paper and then placing the card on top.

The final part is to remove the Press’n Seal.  This had to be done slowly as it was quite sticky and the film did leave a tacky residue so I dabbed over the pieces with my Embossing Buddy.

So here are the finished pieces.  On the frame, I added some rhinestones in the gaps and a Happy Anniversary sentiment.

For the second card, I added pearl accents into the gaps and left it blank to add an appropriate sentiment at a later date.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images © 2019 Stampin’ Up!

OMG! Commemorative Artwork

My dear friend, Lorie, established a charity called Project 71 which supports war veterans who, for the most part, live in our local area.  She works tirelessly to raise funds and raise awareness of the charity so that, at no cost to themselves, the veterans can enjoy lunches together, trips abroad, for example to Normandy and Arnhem, for the veterans to pay their respects to those who didn’t return home.  Project 71 also provides assistance to the veterans in the form of lifts to places, providing mobility scooters, doing the shopping or just visiting at home or in hospital to have a cup of tea and a chat.  Lorie has a group of volunteers from all walks of life that help her to provide these things for the veterans. The work they do is humbling and amazing in equal measures.  Please visit their site via the link below to see the wonderful things they do.

http://www.project71.co.uk/

Just over a year ago, Lorie sent a request out to crafty types via Facebook, to see who would be interested in producing some fabric artwork to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of Operation Market Garden.  The artwork is based on the plate produced by the Market Garden Veterans Association for the 50th anniversary.

The only rules were that the finished badge should be 6” tall and as wide as necessary to keep the proportions right.  Any crafting media or technique using fabric or wool could be used providing they could be joined together as the finished badges would be sewn together and mounted onto a background of parachutes and aircraft.  The finished article will be donated to the National Liberation Museum (Nationaal Bevrijdingsmuseum 1944-1945) in Groesbeek, Netherlands in September 2019 as part of the 75th anniversary weekend.

I chose to make the 50th Infantry Division

and 101st Airborne Division.

The 50th Infantry Division was a division of the British Army whose insignia features two Ts which apparently represent the three main rivers, the Tyne, Tees and Humber, from the recruitment area of the Territorial Army, of which the division was a part before the Second World War.  I immediately saw this design as a crocheted piece and set about creating a stitch grid onto which I could transfer the design.  Then it was simply a case of single crocheting the stitches in the appropriate colour.

The 101st Airborne Division (“Screaming Eagles”) is a light infantry division of the US Army who were engaged in numerous operations during World War II.  This insignia cried out for appliqué so I got out my felt and Bondaweb and got to work.  First I scaled the insignia on the computer so that the image was just under 6” tall.  I then traced this onto tracing paper as the reverse image is needed to trace onto the Bondaweb due to it being attached on the back of the fabric by ironing.

The next step was to carefully cut out the images and adhere them by removing the backing and ironing them in position.

I hit a slight snag when I started to appliqué the letters as the felt was not holding its shape and the resulting mess was not acceptable!  I experimented with various styles of attachment and found that stitching over the entire letter produced the best result, but not using felt as the fibres stuck up through the gaps between the thread.  I remade the letters using yellow fabric, coloured the centres of the letters with black sharpie (cheat!) and sewed over the whole letter using a closely spaced zig-zag stitch.

Top shows the experiments, bottom is the finished piece.

Now it was time to assemble the piece.  I used a piece of khaki linen fabric and quilted it in a diamond pattern and then simply attached the badge pieces on top.

The edges of the piece were finished using the overlocker to get the piece to the correct size.

These are some of the other pieces of work that other crafters have made.

I’m looking forward to seeing the finished piece once Lorie has finished the construction.

Project 71 is a small charity where 100% of the money donated goes to supporting the veterans.  If you would like to donate and help out this very worthy cause, please click on the link below.  Any donation will be much appreciated.

https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/panicbutton

 

 

 

Who can resist?

Mr L and I recently returned from a fabulous holiday to Bangkok where I purchased this beautiful scarf.  I had walked past it twice, admiring it from a distance, but on the third time I could resist no longer and bought it – because I loved it and you can never have too many scarves!

Something about the scarf made me wonder if I could recreate the colours and effects on the scarf for a card and the only way I could think to achieve this was to use the emboss-resist technique and some ink blending.

I began by doing some simple emboss-resist by repeat stamping images on white card using Versamark ink and then applying clear embossing powder.

Once heat set, I blended pastel inks over the card.  The embossing powder ‘resists’ the ink so the card gets coloured and the images stay white although sometimes a quick wipe with a tissue is needed to clean off any ink from the embossed images.

Round one was a success so I decided to try for the recreation of the scarf.  This required ink blending first and then stamping with Versamark and applying clear embossing powder once the ink was dry.

Once the embossing powder was heat set, I sponged black ink over the card, adding layers until I had the depth of colour I wanted.  Again, a tissue was needed at the end just to remove any black ink residue from the embossed images.  I tried both pastel and bright inks and I think the brights are more suited to this technique.

I’m quite happy with the brights background and I think it looks quite similar to the scarf so mission accomplished!

The pastel under black doesn’t have quite the same contrast but still looks pretty.

I thought the two white and pastel cards were suitable for Easter cards as, whilst they don’t have the standard bunnies/chicks/eggs design, they are quite spring like.

I think it’s important when you’ve spent time making the background for that to be the focal point of the card so I only added small greetings so that the background could still shine through.  A lovely little sprig of blackthorn flowers helps set the scene.

 

 

 

 

Images © 2019 Stampin’ Up!

Cat Heart Card

The idea for this card came to me whilst trying to think of a quick project to make an anniversary card for Mr L.  It had to be quick as we were going on holiday for our anniversary and I had to make it in the hour before the taxi picked us up and I hadn’t even finished packing! Panic crafting at it’s best!! It uses the partial die cutting technique to get the opening heart shape and would be perfect for anniversary, valentine and wedding cards.  I also wanted to have a go at hand lettering for the sentiment to fill the heart spaces.

Since the card for Mr L was made in somewhat of a rush, it opens the wrong way (!) and the front heart overhangs the edge.  I had thought that was an error but when I made the MkII version, I realised it was due to the card stock not being wide enough so the second version is only single fold rather than bifold. I used a heart die but circle dies would also work.

The partial die cut is made by placing the die in position on the card front, overlapping the score line, and lining the top cutting pad up along the score line.

When run through the Big Shot, the die will not cut beyond the cutting pad.  I trimmed the excess off down the score line to create the heart shaped front.

I die cut a smaller heart for the front and a piece of Gingham Gala DSP for the inside and decorated them with hand lettering.

I used the cat punch and some silver glimmer paper to make the two cats for the front.

I also punched two cats from the gingham paper for the back of the cats.

I reversed the cats on this card and intertwined the tails rather than having them head to head.

 

 

 

Images © 2019 Stampin’ Up!