A Cricut Challenge

I bought this Nordic ornament stamp last week and I’ve been trying to think of the best way to present it.  It’s about 5¼” across and I don’t have any dies that big.  Also, I wanted it to have the hanger part on the top too so a straight circle die wouldn’t work.  This seemed like a perfect job for the Cricut.

To begin, I stamped the hanger and bow and scanned it in to my computer.  I imported it into Inkscape using a great tutorial from TroyTube on YouTube and then added an offset (the red part) to give me my basic cut-out shape.  I played around with the shape a bit to remove the holes to make the cut-out section sturdier.

Next, I uploaded the finished shape into Cricut Design Space and scaled it to fit the stamped image.  I made the basic card shape by making a circle 5½” diameter and welding the ornament hanger onto the top.  I also sliced a smidge off the bottom so that the card would stand up.  The shape was duplicated and flipped horizontally so that it would be a mirror image and then overlapped the first circle a small amount to give a place for the fold.  A test cut revealed not quite a perfect fit but close enough.

My first card was for a swap in a Facebook group.  I stamped the image in Versamark and heat embossed in white before blending pink, purple and blue inks over.  The embossing resists the ink but gives texture with a lovely blended background.  Lastly, I added some rhinestones on the centre of the snowflakes and a small sentiment.  And a decorated envelope, of course!

I tried the stamp out on other coloured cards to see if it was as effective.  It gave good results whether it was heat embossed or just stamped, although a stamp positioner does help as it’s tricky to get all sections of big stamps to stamp well first time.

White embossing powder on Real Red and gold embossing powder on Shaded Spruce
White embossing powder on Sahara Sand and silver ink on Blackberry Bliss

I hate waste so try to salvage anything that hasn’t gone to plan.  Tags to the rescue!

A Whale of a Time

For the past month, I have been sewing up a storm to complete a set of 12 Days of Christmas ornaments for my Mum’s birthday.  This is the 4th set of these ornaments I’ve made (see post from April 2019) and usually, they take me about 3 months to make (at a leisurely pace!) so making these in 4 weeks was quite a challenge.  I decided to make them in a limited colour palette to give the cohesive look of a set, choosing felt in two shades of red, green and grey together with white and gold.  The embroidery was done in coordinating threads. Here’s the finished set.

1-4: Partridge and Pear, Turtle Dove, French Hen and Calling Bird
5-8: Gold Ring, Goose-a-laying and her egg, Swan-a-swimming and Maid Milking
9-12: Drummer, Piper, Lady Dancing and Lord-a-leaping and a bonus heart!

My Mum’s Christmas tree is only diddy and would be overpowered by these ornaments so I got her a twig tree for displaying these.  I’m really hoping Mum will like them.

For the birthday card, I used the Stampin’ Up! Whale Done and Whale of a Time DSP to make a shaker card.  First of all, I used the Seabed embossing folder with some vellum to decorate the inside of my card as this looks really pretty against a dark cardbase.

Next, I made the shaker element, using the Whale of a Time sequins.  I covered the top of the frame with some metallic card embossed with the Subtle embossing folder.

The set didn’t have the sentiment that I wanted so I handwrote them onto thin strips of Pretty Peacock card using a white gel pen.  The last job was to add a square of card inside to write on, which I stamped with the tiny fish from the set.

Images © 2020 Stampin’ Up!

Snowflake Spinner Card

This week’s project is a fun card, giving a little surprise to the recipient.  When the card is opened, the snowflake spins around. Of course, it doesn’t have to be a spinning snowflake, you can use any shape.  I include a star shaped card at the end which looks really cool!

To begin, I cut the aperture from the card base and layers.  To get them to line up perfectly, I layered the pieces without gluing, placed my circle die and held them all in place with a post-it note for running through the Big Shot. The card base didn’t cut through as there were too many layers but it did leave an impression so I knew where to put the die the second time around.

Next, I stamped my snowflake images and cut them out.  They seemed a little flimsy for my purpose so I cut another 2 snowflakes from thick Whisper White card and stuck one to the back of each stamped image.  I sandwiched a length of beading elastic down the centre of the two snowflakes to make the spinning element.  I have also seen people use dental floss or fishing line for the supporting line; I tried embroidery floss to begin with and that didn’t work very well.

I glued the DSP onto the mat layer and then the two ends of elastic were adhered top and bottom of the aperture on the back of the mat layer.

This whole panel was then glued onto the card base, using plenty of strong adhesive at the elastic anchor points.

Using the Snowflake Wishes stamp set, I stamped the liner and my sentiment.

To make it spin for the recipient, just twist the spinner round 4 or 5 times before placing it in the envelope.  Here is the finished card in action!

After completing this card, I wanted to see if it would work with a more complex shape so made this one using the Stitched Stars dies and Brightly Gleaming DSP.  It did!

Images © 2020 Stampin’ Up!