Patient Puss

Like me, my sister is a big fan of cats so, when it came to making a card for her birthday, it called for another outing for Mooch (Lavinia stamps). I’d recently bought a gel press plate for making backgrounds using mixed media so this was a first outing for that – and for me using it!

To begin, I brayered some Distress Oxide inks in Weathered Wood and Duck Egg onto the gel plate, spritzed with a little water, then pressed my card onto the plate.  This would colour the moon.  Next, I applied a selection of pink and purple Oxides onto the gel plate, added an acetate circle to mask the area for the moon, spritzed with water again and then pressed the card onto the plate.

I wanted the cat to be highlighted by the moon so decided to have him sitting on a wall, made using a brickwork stencil, and then stamped Mooch on top.

The final stage was framing the scene which I did with Dandelion and Thistle silhouette stamps, also from Lavinia.  I then used the Feather Leaf stencil to add a little texture to the sky area.  To finish, I added some glitter around the moon and some stars and added some black Nuvo drops onto the silhouettes for subtle reflection from the moon.

To finish the card, I used an 8” x 8” card base and added a black mat to both my topper and the decorative layer beneath.  This was just a piece of white card that I blended the same purple and pink Oxide inks onto and then added the Feather Leaf stencil to coordinate with the topper.

The other thing I made for my sister was a cat themed cake.  I saw this idea on Facebook ages ago and though I know just the person I can make that for.  It made everyone laugh and nobody refused a slice, despite the subject matter!

Musing Mouch

This week’s post is inspired by another YouTube video for Lavinia stamps, this one by Eileen Godwin.  The main feature of the card is the silhouette of the cat, Mooch; I just love him!

To begin, I used my brushes and a combination of grey and pink inks and the Lavinia Charming stencil.

I was aiming for a rough heart shape.

Next, I stamped mooch using Versafine Clair Nocturne ink.

Lastly, I added the Star Cluster, also from Lavinia around Mooch’s head.  I realised that this stage that the layout of the card didn’t sit quite right so I added some text using Inkylicious Background Text stamp and a Stampin’ Up! sentiment.  This panel was then mounted on a cream 4” square card base.

For the other card, I kept it simple and just cut it down into a smaller square and layered onto a pink mat.

Which do you prefer? I think the second, simpler one is my favourite.

Fond Farewell

These days, when you buy a voucher for someone, particularly if it’s purchased online, you get an emailed voucher for you to print out.  Giving someone a sheet of paper for a gift is not very inspiring!  So, when my friend and colleague, Stu, retired recently, I was asked to create a presentation folder for said sheet of paper.  Inspired by the London skyline pop-up card I made my friend a few weeks ago, I decided to try an air traffic pop-up card.  I made it airfield themed, even though we are Area Controllers, as an Area Control building is not quite as interesting or recognisable as a control tower!

First, for the front of the card, I repeat stamped and heat embossed the bi-plane and clouds from Avery Elle’s ‘Fly By’ stamp set and stacked several die-cut ‘congrats’.  I popped one of the bi-planes up on foam tape.

To begin the inside, I cut out a control tower, some random airport buildings, a city skyline, some fighter aircraft, smoke trails, an airliner and my sentiment using my Cricut Maker.

I used my homemade cloud stencil and ink blending brushes to create a sky background for the fighter planes.

The display aircraft, smoke trails, greeting and city skyline were cut from vinyl and stuck onto the background.

After cutting the card to create the pop-up mechanism, I attached the airport buildings as the central layer and the control tower as the front.

Stu had done an Open University course and part of that included a project for running his own airline, which he’d named Skylark, hence the Skylark airliner parked by the tower.

Finally, where to put the sheet of paper containing the voucher?  Since an airfield is not complete without a runway, I thought a lift up runway would be just the job for a voucher holder.  Using the Cricut Maker again, I cut some piano keys (the white stripes at the start of the runway), some centreline markers and numbers for the runway designation.  Runways are named according to the compass bearing, rounded to the nearest 10˚, so I used Stu’s 34 years in air traffic to make Runway 34.  I popped a tiny magnet under the end of the runway to keep it down.

Enjoy your retirement Stu!