At an Angle

Sometimes, a jaunty angle can really add a new dimension to a project.  When I first tried this card, I cut it straight across and it looked… well… distinctly average.  However, make a diagonal cut and the whole thing is transformed.  I give you three options, depending how much work you want to put in!

To begin, I stamped the greeting from Stampin’ Up! Snowflake Wishes on the bottom of my card front, just so I had an idea of how much to chop off.  I found a nice angle if I lined up the bottom right corner with the top of the grid section on my trimmer and the top right corner against the stop rail.  This also allowed me to repeat the cards at more or less the same angle.

The top section was embossed using the Winter Snow folder and I covered the join with a ¼” strip of Balmy Blue glimmer paper, trimming the ends flush with the white panel.

The whole panel was mounted onto a Balmy Blue layer and then onto a white card base.

For an easier option, I cut a piece of Snowflake Splendour DSP about 5” long and a piece of Whisper White about 1½”, placed the white piece on the right side of the patterned paper and cut both together at the same angle.

I flipped over the white piece and stamped the sentiment, then covered the join with the strip of Balmy Blue glimmer paper.  By cutting the two pieces together, the pieces should have the same angle and match up.  Hopefully!  The piece was trimmed to size and mounted like the previous card.

The last option is a bit more work.  I embossed the white piece with the Subtle folder and cut out a selection of snowflakes using the So Many Snowflakes dies.  Tip: applying a sheet of adhesive to the glimmer paper before die cutting the snowflakes makes the next step much easier.  Guess who didn’t remember to do that!  These snowflakes were stuck onto the embossed piece and any overhanging bits were trimmed off.

This panel was mounted like the previous cards.

One design, 3 different looks!

 

 

Images © 2020 Stampin’ Up!

Circle Christmas Tree

The idea for this card came from seeing one of those Christmas tree ornaments made from baubles.  It got me thinking how I could make one using circles.  Here’s the result!  I think this would be a fun card to make with children.

I began by drawing a triangular tree shape on my card top layer.  I used a tree stamp but any rough triangular shape will do.  Then, after dry embossing a selection of card in Shaded Spruce, Real Red and gold foil, I punched circles of various sizes.  If you wanted to use die cut circles, you’d have to cut first then emboss.

The circles were roughly arranged in the tree shape.  To help me remember the placement for gluing, I took a quick shot of the layout and then removed the circles to erase the triangle.

I glued all the circles in place, stamped and heat embossed my greeting, mounting it on a layer of Shaded Spruce and a length of Real Red ribbon.  To finish, I added a die cut star to the top on foam tape and rhinestones into some of the gaps to resemble fairy lights.

Simple but effective.

 

 

Messy Eaters!

Do you have a messy eater in your family? I can ask this as I am one myself! This is largely borne by our slovenly ways of eating our tea from lap trays in front of the TV rather than sitting at the table.  To resolve this problem, instead of making us eat at the table, I made myself a bib.  I got my pattern from the website shown at the end however, since Craftsy ceased a few months ago, it’s no longer available.  The shape is fairly simple though so it’d be easy to draught yourself.  This is my original.

I made this one for my sister (we’re a family of messy eaters, apart from my Mum!) for a funny birthday gift – she had asked for one so I was confident she wouldn’t be offended.  Like me, she is a big cat fan so cat-themed fabric had to be used.   After washing and drying the fabrics to pre-shrink them, I started by cutting out a front, some quilt wadding (extra absorbency!) and a backing (cut out the opposite was to the front).

After attaching the wadding to the back piece, I sewed the front and back together, leaving a gap at the bottom.  I graded the seam allowance and snipped the curves before turning the right way out through the gap and pressing the edges.

Next, I top stitched all around the edge of the bib before marking up quilting lines.  This step is entirely optional but I think it looks nice.  I use a heat erasable pen called Pilot Frixion (from Amazon, of course!) to draw my lines.  After sewing the quilting lines, I ran the iron over the bib and all the pen marks disappeared, like magic!

The last job was to attach some Velcro for fastening, although snaps or press studs would work equally well.

And here’s the finished article!

To make it look a bit nicer as a gift, I folded it and wrapped with a ribbon and a fun tag. Have I given you a top Christmas gift idea??!

 

 

http://www.hemmein.com/upcycled-grown-up-bibs/