Gorgeous Gift Wallet

Giving money is thought, by some, to be lacking in thought.  However, I like it since it gives the recipient free reign to spend it wherever they want rather than being tied to a particular store with a gift card.  One of my colleagues managed to get married last year so the watch had a collection for him and his new wife.  Quite a substantial sum was collected and we didn’t want to present it in a tatty white envelope, so I was asked to make a presentation wallet.

Making a presentation wallet (of any size) is fairly straight forward but needs a bit of planning out.  To begin, the finished size and depth is required to draw up a plan view.  This will help determine if your box can be cut from one sheet of card or not.  This is my plan for the box I made which was 3¾” x 5⅝” x ¼”.  Once the front, back and pocket sections are added, together with the top, base and sides (for the depth), the next thing is to work out where the tabs need to go in order to glue the box together.

I don’t usually go to the trouble of drawing my plan out to scale, it usually looks like the sketch in the top of the next photo!  After scoring all the lines, I then used these as guides for cutting away the excess card, which left me with this.

I cut pieces of DSP to decorate the panels and also added a thin magnet underneath the pocket panel.  A magnetic closure always makes a gift wallet feel that bit more special!

Once all the decorative panels were in place, I dropped the other magnet onto the front of the wallet.  It was naturally drawn into the correct place, where I added a spot of glue under it.

To cover the magnet, I then made a focal panel from layered ovals, the bride and groom’s initials and some hearts.  I gave the metallic paper some added interest by dry embossing it. I added a polka dot tulle bow as the magnet was just visible.

It’s not shown here but I added a white panel on the back of the front cover (the part at the top of this photo) on which I wrote the message from the watch.

I was really pleased to get a message from the couple saying that they loved the personalised gift wallet.  Feedback like that makes creating bespoke gifts all the more rewarding!

Swing Fold Card

This fancy fold card style has lots of dimension and extra wow! when it’s opened and the parts move.  It may look a little complicated but it’s not really.

To begin, I cut my card base and a layer of DSP and cut a rectangle from the front of the pair of them, attached together with a little temporary adhesive.  The piece of card base will be used later so don’t discard it!

Next, I cut the liner, which is also the mechanism to make the swing fold.  Score the card at ¼, ½ and ¾ across the piece and fold ‘mountain-mountain-valley’, as shown in the photo.

Place the liner with the first ‘mountain’ fold facing up into the card front and mark the left-hand side of the hole.  Remove the liner and cut away slightly bigger than the hole using either a trimmer or I used the next size up rectangle die and the partial die-cutting technique.

The liner is then glued into the card base by adhering the bit around the cut away to the back of the opening and the last quarter of the lining to the right-hand side of the back of the card base. 

After gluing the DSP onto the front, I attached the swing panel, which is the section of card base cut out at step 1.  Apply the glue to the swing mechanism only and attach the panel.

Lastly, decorate as you wish!

I used Stampin’ Up! Pampered Pets for my cards.

It’s also possible to make this card in landscape format too and using an oval cut out rather than a rectangle.

I think I’ll try a square version next time to give more space for writing my message.

Images © 2021 Stampin’ Up!

Butterfly Floating Window

You may remember the Christmas floating window card from a post back in September 2020.  This time, I thought I’d try it out in portrait layout.  As the acetate panel is larger than in landscape format, it’s a bit flimsy but this problem can be remedied by adding a decorative element on top, joining all three sections together.

My card base was my standard size of 11½” x 4¼”, scored at 5¾.  I then cut off 1½” off the bottom and cut the card base at 1½” after the score line.  I used some (retired) mercury acetate for the window and cut some mats for the small card sections.

For my decorative element, I die cut the SU! Butterfly Beauty dies using white for the base layer and the retired Lovely Lipstick foil for the top layer to really make the butterflies pop.

After dry embossing the green mat layer, I assembled the card base, gluing down the mats and attaching the acetate behind.

I added some layers inside and embossed the envelope flap with the same embossing folder as I’d used on the front of the card.

As I said at the beginning, the card is quite flimsy at this stage so the butterflies need to be adhered to the top and bottom of the card and also to the acetate to give some structure.  I used double sided tape for the acetate and glue for the top and bottom.  My tip for where to place the glue is to position the butterfly face down on the card, roughly where it’s going to be and then you can clearly see which bits can be glued to the card.

The sentiment is from Itty Bitty Birthday and doesn’t quite fit in the Classic Label punch so I had to fussy cut it.  However, I was making two of these cards and was determined not to be beaten so I stamped the sentiment again, this time stamping one word at a time and… ta-da!… it can now be punched out with the Classic Label punch.

Images © 2021 Stampin’ Up!